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Author Archives: Breakfast with Nick

Travel: Dining on the Outer Banks – Part 1

In June our family made the annual trek to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Those of you who have followed the blog for a while may know it’s a long-standing family tradition, and we look forward to it every year. In addition to all the beachy fun, we enjoy the food the islands have to offer, as we visit old favorites and see what’s new each year. So without further ado, here are some of the culinary highlights of OBX 2014!

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On a tip from a reader last year, we finally discovered Duck Donuts, a relatively new donut chain originating in Duck on the northern Outer Banks. Over the past year Duck Donuts has expanded into nearby Virginia, too, and they seem to be holding steady on the OBX. They use the brilliant model of selling one base, a slightly sweet and spongy cake donut, then dressing that up with frostings and toppings.

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This lets them easily assemble larger orders for the visitors coming and going around the island.

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Frostings include everything from strawberry, lemon, vanilla, chocolate, peanut butter, and beyond.

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They even have an excellent maple bacon donut, with a sweet maple frosting and bacon bits that aren’t too soggy or too crunchy.

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We discovered this year that they offer a little kid’s meal, with a single donut + a drink served on a Duck Donuts frisbee. It even comes with a wet nap!

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But enough about donuts. (I never thought I’d say that.) On the islands we’re really in the mood for seafood. A string of rustic seafood markets dot the islands, hawking the day’s fresh catches. We make regular stops for crab, scallops, clams, shrimp, and fish. My mother-in-law has perfected a crab cake recipe. Because they’re homemade there’s very little filler and the seasoning is spot-on.

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We also crowded the scallops into a pan for a quick sauteed before they were devoured by the masses.

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Besides Duck Donuts, our favorite island pastries are the ridiculously giant apple uglies from Orange Blossom Bakery in Buxton, NC. I swear, these glorified, calorie-ridden apple fritters get larger each year.

Over the past years, the service and organization at Orange Blossom had been declining. Customers were frustrated by long waits, the service was a little surly, and they never seemed to have enough product. This year, however, things seem to be improving – maybe there was a change of ownership?

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Because there’s such a large group of us, we take turns making dinner each night. Mrs. Breakfast With Nick and I made a perennial favorite: shrimp and grits, with lots of tangy cheese mixed in with the grits, a rich topping of sauteed veggies (and a little bacon), and fresh shrimp.

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There’s great coffee on the islands, too. We regularly visit The Dancing Turtle in Hatteras, Uglie Mugs in Avon, and both Live Oak Coffee and Ocracoke Coffee Co. on Ocracoke. Here’s an artistic shot of my espresso on a post with some dead leaves in the background.

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Most restaurants offer lots of fried seafood, and we regularly take them up on the offer.

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One of our favorite stops for fried seafood are the volunteer firefighter’s fish fries. Many of the little island villages host them on a weekly or monthly basis. We especially like the fish fry down in Hatteras Village. The meals usually come with hush puppies, cole slaw, and maybe baked beans or potato salad. Some of these events have been going on for decades. The little old ladies in Hatteras have been doing it for over 50 years, and they’ll wink and tell you theirs is the best on the Outer Banks. Hard to argue when they’re unloading freshly caught fish straight into the fryers.

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As a craft beer aficionado and beer tour guide, I’m always on the lookout for local brews, so we were especially happy to discover the new Pangea Tavern a block from our house in Avon. The little pub has a large screened-in dining room, so you can enjoy the ocean breezes free of mosquitos (which generally aren’t too bad anyway). The real star of their drink menu is the list of 15 North Carolina beers on tap.

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Even better is that they offer beer samplers, so we tasted North Carolina’s takes on pale ales, saisons, amber ales, milk stouts, IPAs, wits, porters, and more. In summary: North Carolina is doing it right.

That’s all for now! Stay tuned for Part 2 shortly.

Sidney’s Cafe & Bistro | Elizabeth City, NC

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Sidney’s Cafe & Bistro (Facebook)
507 E. Main St. (map it!)
Elizabeth City, NC 27909
(252) 331-1944
Open Mon-Wed, 7a-5p; Thurs & Fri, 7a-9p; Sat, 7a-3p
Accepts cash & credit/debit
Vegetarian/vegan/gluten free? Y/N/N
Kid-friendly? Y

Visited: Saturday, June 14, 2014 at 8 a.m.

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Every June we’re fortunate to make a family trip down to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. We look forward to it all year, and enjoy a step away from major civilization onto the barrier islands for a couple weeks of reading, playing on the beach, and eating our way around. But the eating starts well before we hit the bridges crossing Pamlico Sound. We typically drive the longest leg of the trip in one day, stopping over in Elizabeth City. We reward the long day’s drive with fresh fried seafood at Quality Seafood. But we also fuel up the next morning, and this year we did our research and discovered Sidney’s Cafe & Bistro on Main Street.

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I got the sense early on that they were a small cafe, and we were coming with a big group, so we called ahead to make a reservation. They were able to accommodate us, although we got the sense that we were pushing the limits of their small kitchen. To their credit, though, the coffee kept flowing and the food rolled out pretty quickly.

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The menu is not extensive but it covers all the bases, and it includes diverse offerings like eggs benedicts, pancakes, frittatas, and burritos.

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A big group means we get to sample nearly everything on the menu. I personally went for the eggs benedict (hint: if it’s on the menu, chances are I’ll order it). All the components were very well done, including the freshly shredded cheddar cheese. Light hollandaise but still very good; I’d be happy if I could make a hollandaise like that. The portion sizes didn’t feel huge, but they were appropriate for the price point, and certainly flavorful enough to keep everyone satisfied.

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From the kid’s menu: a nice-sized pancake and a well-seasoned sausage patty, which seemed to be made in-house.

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vegetable omelet with potatoes and toast. Loaded with veggies.

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And because we’re in the south, someone had to order grits, so there were multiple bowls of the soft, buttery goodness, topped with shredded cheddar.

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Even with a small kitchen, the two-person crew did everything well, including a la carte orders of eggs.

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Solid biscuits and gravy. Soft and warm biscuits, fairly chunky gravy, although everyone quickly noticed the presence of anise in the gravy. We’ve never had that before, and while it certainly wasn’t bad, it was enough to make everyone pause a moment after tasting it.

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An order of blueberry buttermilk pancakes. As good as you could ask for. Thin but fluffy, dusted with powdered sugar, and with a side of nicely done bacon.

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A spicy breakfast burrito loaded with sausage, eggs, cheese, and veggies. Held together perfectly; packed a big punch.

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And the French toast with a side of sausage. Soft but not mushy.

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Our entire crew left Sidney’s satisfied and impressed. Even with their small kitchen they handled the big round of orders, and there wasn’t a single complaint amongst the group. The bonus is the beautiful little cafe space, with a side entrance along an indoor arcade. The cafe itself is situated in the little downtown of Elizabeth City, which has a lot of potential to be sweet tourist spot.

Bonus connection to Ohio: the owner is from Sidney, Ohio originally, thus the cafe’s name!

Sidney's Cafe & Bistro on Urbanspoon

Mrs. Breakfast with Nick: BLTs and Brussels Sprouts

Part of me always feels like BLTs are cheating a bit. I mean, they’re deceptively simple, easy to make, and not ALL that bad for you. But SO delicious! When I saw that there were some bright red ripe tomatoes and some local Bibb lettuce in the Green Bean Delivery box, I realized we were only BACON away from a BLT, so we pretty much had to do it.

Having produced BaconCamp Columbus for a number of years, Nick and I have tried A LOT of local bacon. All of it is good, most of it is great, and a few are out of this world. Weiland’s bacon is one of those treats that we get once in a while, beautifully thick cut and perfectly marbled.

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My trusty helper was all about showing off his kitchen skills. He said he wanted me to caption this picture “Long Bacon” as he inexplicably tore one in two. We’ll go with it.

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As you can tell, we like using our cast iron skillet to make bacon, and we mess it all up – no careful strips, no flat pieces. Just separate each piece, lay in the pan, and stir with tongs. I know I’m going to catch flack on this, but we just love the caramelization you get with the cast iron, and I have no patience for flat bacon cooking.

I will say, though, when I want to make a lot of bacon for family and friends, or events (we cooked 30 pounds of bacon on the mornings of BaconCamp… in my kitchen… and another 30 at the event itself!), I use parchment paper on rolled aluminum trays in the oven. Doing more than a few pounds in the cast iron skillet builds up a nasty layer on the bottom of the pan that interferes with the cooking process after 2 or 3 rounds.

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While it’s cooking, slice the tomatoes into thin slices. Aren’t they beautiful? Who is READY for tomato season!? We have 15 tomato plants in the garden ready to burst!

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Cook the bacon until it is right before your preferred doneness, which, in our case, crispy dark edges with softer parts, but little light fat areas. I usually pull it out of the pan onto a plate with napkins to let it cool, and it will keep cooking on the plate. (Be sure to save the bacon fat! Let it cool, strain it, and put it in your freezer. You’ll thank me later, when you remember that you have it and that you want to make eggs in it and they are delicious.)


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BONUS RECIPE!

So, even though these aren’t from the Green Bean Delivery box, they were in my fridge… so, I threw together my favorite way to make brussels sprouts. When I have time, or when I make Thanksgiving or Christmas dinners, I roast the sprouts after tossing them in olive oil in a 400 degree oven for 20-30 minutes. They get beautifully dark and crispy. Today, the natives were hungry and impatient, so I decided to steam them by cutting them all in half, adding an inch or so of water in our microwave steamer, and putting it in for 6 minutes.

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After they come out, bright green and tender, add a handful of blue cheese crumbles, some dried cranberries, cracked pepper, sea salt, and a few shots of balsamic vinegar or balsamic vinegar sauce (which is usually thickened with corn syrup). If you have REAL aged balsamic vinegar, you lucky devil… now invite me to dinner.

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Toss it together, and you get a beautiful sweet salty green side dish in no time.


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Oh! I also whipped up some peanut-butter celery sticks with sea salt, using the great celery that was in the Green Bean box. I’m assuming you can figure out how to do this, so I won’t insult you with a recipe… but trust me that the sea salt is worth it.

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My boys like to eat “picnic-style,” which involves this ridiculously huge wooden tray I’ve had forever. I set everything out on it, and then they can build their meal at the table. We had made a few loaves of bread that day, so it was a perfect fit.

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The finished meal! We toasted the bread a bit, added mayo – and kept it simple. It was a perfect summer dinner!

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Mrs. Breakfast with Nick: Eggs, Potatoes and Toast

Sometimes, you need to stick with the classics. When we go to a new breakfast place, I can always count on Mr. Breakfast with Nick to order the Classic Breakfast – usually eggs, potatoes, bacon and toast. It’s a great way to test the place on the basics – which are, in our humble opinion, the most important indicators of a restaurant’s foundation. Our Green Bean Delivery box came with some beautiful potatoes, and I was eager to try yet another way to make hash browns…or home fries…or breakfast potatoes…whatever you call them, there are as many recipes in a city as there are people and we keep trying new ways to do them. Normally, what we like is to use some russets, boil them for 12 minutes first, chop them, and then pan “fry” them in a cast-iron skillet. These new potatoes were more tender, with two of them being classic reds, and I knew they could stand to just be chopped and thrown in to a pan with some great bacon fat. (This was a day I was also making bread, so although there are no veggies in our bread from Green Bean, I included that process below as well!)

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I kept the pieces very small, less than 1 cm. square, knowing that the heat would have to cook through without having boiled them first.

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I chopped up part of an onion from the Green Bean Box as well as half a red and orange pepper to throw in. I sautéed the onions and the peppers in the bacon fat (we keep some in our freezer for these very occasions!), and threw the potatoes in when the cast-iron skillet was very hot.

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Last year, Chef Butcher from Creole Kitchen gave Nick this incredible cajun seasoning and I try and throw it in whenever I can, so I sprinkled a bit of this on the potatoes as they cooked. (You can see I’m running low!)

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I fried up a nice egg – check out Nick’s post on Ways to Cook an Egg on lots of ways you can add one to this meal.

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And there you go! The little brown bits on the potatoes were the best part, of course, and the cast iron skillet was the right choice. I still think, given the choice, I would go to the boil-first and then fry method, as they did take a bit longer to cook and they soaked up more of the bacon fat than I liked. But it was still delicious!

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Now on to the toast… About four years ago, Dave Scarpetti of webercam.com fame hosted Nick and I and some friends for a bread-making class. He is a brilliant scientist, and had perfected his baguette recipe that he was sharing with us. I remember very specifically saying to a friend that night “This is fun, but there is NO WAY I have time to make bread every other day.” Well… I went home and, on a whim, tried it on my own. And then tried it again, and again… and for the past four years, we have been making bread every three days for our family.

We do this for a few reasons: 1. We know what is in our bread. We buy good ingredients, and that’s all that goes in. 2. Cost – for 2 loaves of beautiful crispy bread, it costs us $1. Our boys eat more than most adults, so every penny helps. And 3. The taste. Come on over, we’ll make you a believer.

The thing that makes it work, though, is keeping it simple. We have a specific area in our cupboard with all the bread ingredients, a measuring cup that stays with the flour, and bottles for the other ingredients that stay in one place all the time. We also use our bread machine to knead the dough and bring it through the first rise. I know it’s cheating, and I don’t care. I love it. (And we have never once baked bread in our bread machine, so we felt like we needed to use it for something!) And we use a scale. USE. A. SCALE. I can’t stress this enough. Baking is a science and science takes precise measurements. Your scale doesn’t need to be fancy – ours has a units and a tare button – that’s all.

We measure directly into the breadmaker container on the scale, water and flour first. Then yeast. I have tried lots of yeasts, and my favorite is Fleischman’s ActiveDry. I also like the packets much better than the little jar container. It stays active much longer, because once yeast is exposed to air it starts to slow down. And, even with making bread 2 or 3 times per week, by the time we finished the container of yeast, we had issues with the loaves not rising.

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Here are my ever-so-fancy squirt bottles ($1 each at Wasserstrom).

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Each of the bottles, containing olive oil, kosher salt, and sugar, has a different cut spout depending on how fast I need it to come out for measuring.

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For the first rise, you lock the pail into the breadmaker and put it on the “dough” setting. (If you don’t have a breadmaker, never fear! Check out the recipe below for how to make it without one.)  It will take about an hour and a half and come out looking like this:

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Dump the dough out onto a floured wooden board and shape into a rough mound. I say wood, because we have found that temperature and moisture control are both very important at this point. Something like granite is going to cool the dough down too quickly, and plastic or metal for the second proof doesn’t afford as much rise. Maybe I’m making that all up in my head, but we’ve tried it all the ways, and this is what worked best for us.

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Cut the mound in half, and shape each ball into a smooth ‘boule’ shape. This is done by using both hands to fold the outsides under and to the bottom center underneath the ball of dough. This allows a nice “skin” to begin forming. Dust the tops with some flour and cover with a damp cloth. (What I do is form the boules, wash my hands, dry them on a clean dishcloth and use that to cover…it’s all a system after so many times of doing it!) Turn on the over to 425 degrees.

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After about 25 minutes (depending on the time of year), your oven will be at a rip-roaring temp (there is no way it is at 425 after the normal pre-heating cycle – ours never is), and the boules will have doubled in size.

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Move them to a cheap vegetable grilling pan. Yep. You heard me right. A vegetable grilling pan – they sell them at Lowe’s 2 for $3 or something. They are made from thin aluminum and are the BEST ways to bake this specific bread. You can leave them in the boule shape or form more “loaves” by tucking in two sides and setting it down on the “seam.” The slashes we do with a very sharp serrated blade, and are where the bread is going to split and grow during baking. You can also use a straight knife, a razor blade, or kitchen shears.

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The most important step of this recipe is the water and is impossible to really show you in a picture. In order to get a beautiful brown crispy crust, throw 1/2 cup of water on the bottom of your oven which, for us, means directly on the filament. It creates steam which moves up through the holes in the pan and perfectly crisps the crust. You can do it without this step, but it won’t be as crispy.

20 minutes in a hot oven, and there you have it – two beautiful crispy loaves.

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Ingredients:

  • 400g water
  • 1 packet yeast (7g)
  • 20g vegetable oil
  • 20g sugar
  • 10g salt
  • 600g flour (unbleached all-purpose – high quality)*

Directions:

1. Add the ingredients, in the above order, to a bowl and mix to combine. (Rubber spatula works well.)
2. Turn out on a floured surface, cover, and let rise for 1.5 – 2 hours; it should double in size.
3. Punch down and divide into two balls, turning the dough under itself to create a smooth, tight surface. (This is where you can knead in raisins, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, nuts, etc…
4. Turn oven on to 450 degrees. It will take a normal oven about 25 minutes to get up to this temperature.
5. Place on floured surface, cover, and let sit for 30 minutes, or until a fingerprint in the surface of the dough almost disappears when you press into it.
6. Transfer the boules to a thin aluminum vegetable grilling sheet (with holes in it).
7. Take a sharp serrated knife and make 3 parallel slices in the tops of the dough balls, about 3/4 inches deep.
8. Put the bread in the center rack of the oven and throw 1/2 cup of water onto the bottom floor of the oven, right on the metal base or the element. It will steam like crazy. QUICKLY shut the door to trap the steam. Bake for 18 minutes.
9. Take out and let it cool down! Don’t eat (any) bread right out of the oven – the gluten doesn’t have time to set and it will be gummy and taste awful. If you want to eat it warm, let it cool and then warm it back up.

*A Note about Flour – You can use a mix of white and white whole wheat flour (King Arthur is great) but don’t use any more than 1/3 wheat to make up the 600g. Also, use the highest quality flour you can buy. I have tried 15 or so types of low-end flours, Aldi’s, Wal-Mart, etc… these will just waste your time. I use Montana Sapphire Unbleached All-Purpose and I buy it in 25 pound bags at Giant Eagle. Just try to buy the best kind you can, and try different kinds. The price difference is worth it.

Mrs. Breakfast with Nick: Kale Yes!

We were eating kale before it was cool.

Honestly, this salad has been a staple at our family’s meals for years, and every time I serve it to someone new, I get asked for the “recipe.” So after many awkward conversations of “well, you just put it together with other stuff…” I actually did come up with one that I share when anyone asks.

I *may* have squealed a bit when I saw that the Green Bean Delivery box included kale, and again when I saw that it was Italian lacinato kale, which I hadn’t tried yet with this salad. The leaves are more rubbery than grocery store kale, not as “spiky,” with flatter stalks. I also got two beautiful limes in the box, which were a perfect addition.

Most varieties of home-garden kale are a bit more tender and can more readily be eaten like spinach or greens. Almost all kale I have purchased at the grocery store has been very tough and needs to be broken down in some way – either by cooking, marinating, or mashing up like this salad. (Note: This salad’s proper name is “Massaged Kale Salad,” but I always get a bit uncomfortable with the idea of “massaging” vegetables. So I usually just say “Kale Salad.” I know, real descriptive.)

We started with a quick wash on the beautiful bunch of kale. (Again, thoughts of green and green-blue paint colors…)

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Then, the most fun part of pulling the leaves off the stalks. Essentially, just grab the stalk with your left hand, and then the leaves with your right hand and slide them away from one another. The edible leaves will come right off the stalk.

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You’ll end up with a pile of beautiful leaves, which you can then roughly chop or tear into bite-sized pieces. Throw all the pieces into a gallon-sized freezer or storage bag.

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Then you want to start making the dressing, right in the bag: a few tablespoons of local honey, 1/8 c extra virgin olive oil, a few twists of fresh cracked pepper…

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…1/2 a fresh squeezed lemon or lime, and a 1/2 teaspoon of cracked sea salt or kosher salt. The secret ingredient that brings everything together is 2 tablespoons of guacamole. We always keep a few bags of Wholly Guacamole in our fridge and freezer for a quick snack or to add to recipes – the fat in the avocados is unbeatable. (You can obviously use fresh avocados – we have just found that lining up their ripe-window with your need-to-use-them-window is tricky, and our boys eat more guacamole than you would believe.)

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Once you have the dressing in the bag, squeeze all the air out and seal tightly. Then start mashing! This takes longer with more rubbery kales, and much shorter with garden-fresh kale (our kale-towers in the backyard are almost ready t0 start harvesting!). I would say mash and smash for about 2-3 minutes. What you are trying to achieve here is two-fold: 1. Marinating the kale in the acid of the lemon/lime juice and olive oil, and 2. Breaking down the fibers of the kale with the fresh ground pepper and cracked sea salt. (This is why I stress using fresh ingredients whenever you can. Canned lime/lemon juice is great for some things, but won’t be as strong, and fresh cracked pepper and salt provide the rough edges that pre-ground and table salt don’t.)

After about 5 minutes, open the bag and try a leaf. You can adjust the sweetness, saltiness, and acid levels. If you’re questioning the size of your bunch of kale, try adding less of the ingredients at the beginning so you can adjust up at this point.

For the toppings, I stick to the rule of 1 nut or seed, 1 dried fruit, and 1 cheese and start with a tossing in a small handful of each. Some of our favorite combos are:

Pepitas, dried cranberries and goat cheese

Sliced almonds, dried blueberries and sharp cheddar

Pine nuts, dried apricots, and parmesan


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This is sure to be a crowd pleaser – making it is really fun, and good to get little hands involved in mashing the bag of kale!

“Massagaed” Kale Salad

1 bunch of kale, stalks removed and discarded, leaves chopped or torn into bite-sized pieces

1/2 lemon or lime, juiced

1/8 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2-1 tsp fresh cracked sea salt or kosher salt

1 tbs local honey

1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper

1-2 tbs avocado or guacamole (optional)

Toppings: 1/4 c each to taste:

Cheese (feta, parmesan, goat, sharp cheddar, etc…)

Dried fruit (cranberries, blueberries, apricots, raisins, etc…)

Seeds or nuts (pepitas, pine nuts, slivered almons, chopped walnuts, sesame seeds, etc…)

Directions: Place kale and dressing ingredients into a gallon storage or freezer bag, squeeze out all the air and seal. Mash the bag for about 2-3 minutes until the kale is tender and alter dressing ingredients to taste. Dump kale in bowl and toss with 1/4 c of one cheese, one dried fruit and one seed/nut.

Nick’s Note: Many of these ingredients come from our sample Green Bean Delivery. Mrs. Breakfast With Nick last shared a tomato and asparagus quiche she made.

Mrs. Breakfast with Nick: Tomato and Asparagus Quiche

I am excited to be writing my first guest-post on the hubby’s blog! I am the most frequent dining-companion sharing a meal with Breakfast with Nick, and it’s fun to share some of the ways we try and introduce our two boys to great, fresh, local food at home. Nick and I share the cooking in our home, and we approach it very differently. Nick prefers to use a recipe that he sticks to. On the other hand, I view recipes more as “guidelines” and am more adept at throwing something together out of what’s in the kitchen. I’m pretty sure that my superhero power is being able to walk into the kitchen with two hungry boys clawing at my knees and put a (fairly) healthy and well-balanced meal on the table in 20 minutes. I like the challenge of it, I like the fast-decision-making part, and I love the multi-tasking efficiency. So I LOVE mystery food boxes, like CSAs. When Nick told me that we were getting a chance to try out a delivery bin from Green Bean Delivery, I was excited – a whole new bin to create delicious meals!

My first creation was the night after we received the bin. Nick was at an evening meeting, so it was just me and two hungry boys and a bunch of produce. We had a few dozen fresh eggs, and the bin included some beautiful asparagus, tomatoes, kale, and limes. I decided on a quiche and used a tried-and-true recipe I keep memorized for times like this! I made a quick pastry crust, and not wanting to mess with the food processor, I just did everything by hand. Prep for the full thing took about 15 minutes, and with cooking time at 35 minutes, it took a bit longer than usual. But it was worth it.

First things first, I started up the oven at 375 degrees, and gathered items for the pastry crust so it could chill a bit. The basic ingredients for the pastry crust are:
1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter (cut into rough cubes)
3 tablespoons ice water

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In a wide bowl, whisk the flour and salt together, then “cut in” the butter by using a pastry cutter or a few forks until it looks like corn meal. (My normal recipe uses chilled lard as well, but it takes a bit longer, so I’ll show that another time. Butter is delicious too.)
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It should just hold together when pressed, like so:

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Then, going slowly (some say use a spray bottle), add very cold ice water to the mixture a few drops at a time just until it comes together.  I usually just grab a few drops with my hands and spritz it in the bowl.

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Shape into a rough flat disc, wrap in plastic wrap, and put into the fridge for a bit  while you prep the filling. For the filling, my rule of thumb (for my specific pie plate) is 6 eggs, 2 cups of “stuff” (sausage and spinach, asparagus and onions, bacon and mushrooms), spices, and 1/2 cup of cheese. For any veggies, you’ll want to quickly cook those (blanch them in boiling water or sautee in a bit of butter) because the baking portion of the quiche is mainly to cook the eggs, not necessarily cook the other ingredients. (For meat, make sure the bacon, sausage, or chorizo is cooked through.)

For Breakfast with Nick (and those other recipe-followers out there), I did put together a quick “recipe” for this asparagus and tomato quiche:

1 pound fresh asparagus, cleaned and cut into ¾-inch pieces
2 medium tomatoes, cut into eighths
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tsp curry powder
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 cup onions, chopped
6 large eggs
¾ cup milk
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup shredded Dubliner Irish cheddar

Start by boiling some water and throwing some ice water into a separate bowl, filled with water (for the ice bath). Stare at your beautiful locally-grown asparagus for a while, and wonder if you should paint your kitchen in stunning asparagus purples and greens. I did.

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While the water is coming to a boil, chop up the asparagus into 3/4″ pieces and roughly chop the onion. Throw a small saute pan on the stove on medium, and add the butter to melt.

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When the water is at a boil, throw the asparagus in for about 4-5 minutes. Then add the curry and cayenne pepper to the butter, and throw in the onions. Cook the onions until they are translucent and most of the liquid from the butter has cooked off.

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Once the asparagus hit 5 minutes, take them off, strain them, and put them right into the ice bath to stop the cooking. There are few food-textures worse than an overcooked asparagus.

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In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs and milk, and grab your cheese and pie crust. We were lucky enough to have some beautiful fresh eggs from Nick’s brother’s chickens, who was visiting from Kentucky a week earlier. (He also has bees! Follow him at the Rooftop Apiary!)

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Look at those bright big yolks! (I don’t have tiny hands, btw, this is my 5-year old helping out. He wants to be, in no particular order, a chef, builder, printer and jet fighter. Go big or go home.)

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When all your ingredients for the quiche are ready, spread out the plastic wrap and roll the dough using a lightly-floured rolling pin, and press into a pie plate or tart pan.

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If you want to get fancy with the edges, great! I didn’t, because my pie pan is huge and this recipe didn’t make enough. (Which are both excuses for the fact that I am HORRIBLE at crimping pie edges. Just terrible.) (If you’d like to see some BEAUTIFULLY crimped pie-edges, take a trip to Worthington to say hi to AJ Perry at Sassafras Bakery and marvel at the perfect crimps.)

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Sprinkle half of the cheese on the bottom of the chilled pie crust. (I will make a note here that sometimes, some pans don’t do great at cooking the pie crust all the way through in the middle of the bottom of the pie – it stays doughy. If you know this about your pans, try par-baking it at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. When you go to actually bake it, you might need to cover the crust edge with a layer of foil so you don’t burn it.)

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Then dump the asparagus, spiced onions, and tomatoes in.

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Finally, fill it up with the eggs and top it with the rest of the cheese.

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Once you bake it in a 375 degree oven for about 35 minutes, switch it to the top rack for 3-5 minutes on broil (do not walk away from the oven – I’m saying this more for myself than you.) This gives it a great crispy cheese top which, let’s be honest, is why we all eat quiche in the first place. (IGNORE THE NON-CRIMPED EDGES!)

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Let it sit for a few minutes before you slice and enjoy!

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Stay tuned for more creations!

Pastry
1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter (cut into rough cubes)
3 tablespoons ice water

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In a wide bowl, whisk the flour and salt together in a bowl, then “cut in” the butter by using a pastry cutter or a few forks until it looks like corn meal. Taking a few spritzes of cold water (with spray bottle or just using fingers), wet the flour mixture a bit at a time until it just holds together – don’t add too much or it will get sticky. Pat into a flat disc, wrap in plastic wrap and put in fridge for 15-30 minutes. Remove, and then roll out with a floured rolling pin onto the plastic wrap. Then use that to transfer to a pie dish. Depending on your dish, you might need to throw some flour or non-stick spray into the bottom of the pan. Pat the crust into the pan and then crimp the edges. (I’m not the one to ask about this.) Fill, and bake according to pie or quiche instructions.

Asparagus and Tomato Quiche
(Note: try subbing the asparagus, tomatoes, and onions with Bacon and mushrooms or sausage and spinach)

1 pound fresh asparagus, cleaned and cut into ¾-inch pieces
2 medium tomatoes, cut into eighths
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tsp curry powder
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 cup onions, chopped
6 large eggs
¾ cup milk
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup shredded Dubliner Irish cheddar

Instructions:

Start by boiling some water and throwing some ice water into a separate bowl, filled with water (for the ice bath). While the water is coming to a boil, chop up the asparagus into 3/4″ pieces and roughly chop the onion. Throw a small saute pan on the stove on medium, and add the butter to melt. When the water is at a boil, throw the asparagus in for about 4-5 minutes. Then add the curry and cayenne pepper to the butter, and throw in the onions. Cook the onions until they are translucent and most of the liquid from the butter has cooked off. Once the asparagus hit 5 minutes, take them off, strain them, and put them right into the ice bath to stop the cooking. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs and milk, and grab your cheese and pie crust. Sprinkle half of the cheese on the bottom of the chilled pie crust, and dump the asparagus, spiced onions, and tomatoes in. Finally, fill it up with the eggs and top it with the rest of the cheese. Once you bake it in a 375 degree oven for about 35 minutes, switch it to the top rack for 3-5 minutes on broil. Let it sit for a few minutes before you slice and enjoy!

Green Bean Delivery!

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Who’s up for a cooking challenge? Last week the folks at Green Bean Delivery kindly sent us a sample delivery so we could see how their process works. Green Bean delivers fresh goods to homes across Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and Missouri. The orders are customizable, but they also offer set bin sizes. We received the standard Small Produce Bin, which comes pre-loaded with a mixture of fruits and veggies. You can modify your order to include other vegetables, fruits, beans, meats, even finished products like coffee, falafel, roasted nuts, Sriracha, and more. They conveniently label goods that are organically or sustainably grown, and they identify the origins by region or country.

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You can set up a one-time or a recurring order through their website, picking and choosing from over 40 different items of fresh produce. This is the breakdown of our Small Produce Bin.

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Deliveries are dropped off at your home. You’re given a set day of the week and a window of a few hours during which it will arrive. The bright green bin is lined with styrofoam and includes a coldpack, so your food arrives fresh and cool.

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Here’s the bounty from our delivery. Now, I look at this and I’m intimidated, but Mrs. Breakfast With Nick looks at it and sees a challenge. Over the next series of posts, she’ll be sharing some of the things we’ve made from the delivery. Stay tuned!

UPDATE: Here are some of Mrs. Breakfast With Nick’s creations using our Green Bean Delivery!

Tomato and Asparagus Quiche

Kale Salad

Eggs, Potatoes, and Toast

BLTs and Brussels Sprouts

Philco Bar + Diner | Columbus, OH

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Philco Bar + Diner (Facebook / Instagram @philcobd)
747 N. High St. (map it!)
Columbus, OH 43215
(614) 299-9933
Open Mon-Thurs, 8a-11p; Fri, 8a-12a; Sat, 9a-12a; Sun, 9a-11p (bfast served all day)
Accepts cash & credit/debit
Vegetarian/vegan/gluten free? Y/N/N
Kid-friendly? Y

Visited: Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 9:00 a.m.

At the risk of sounding like one of the old folks, it amazes me how much Short North has changed in the twelve years we’ve lived in Columbus. We lived in the heart of Short North our first two years in town, and we’re just now approaching the status of “Back when I lived in Short North…” So, without further ado… back when I lived in Short North, we had Philip’s Coney Island. It was small, cheap, and basic. To be honest, though, we rarely visited. Sure, there were cheap hot dogs and fries, but it didn’t have the same draw as other neighborhood eateries like Press Grill, Mac’s, Betty’s.

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On pace with Short North’s development in recent years, the Philip’s Coney Island space was reborn of late as Philco Bar + Diner, led by the same team as The Rossi, Club 185, Little Palace, etc. The name itself is a nod to the previous life (Philip’s Coney -> Philco), and they’ve retained a sense of the old place, with booths, counter seats, and yes, coneys on the menu. But the revamp has made the space hipper and (in my opinion) a little more comfortable. Plus they’ve added a fine selection of beer and wine.

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The new space certainly feels much classier than the old, with green leather stools and booths, wine racks over the bar, and wood or stainless steel accents.

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There’s still some feeling of the old restaurant, though, where you can sit at the counter and eat hot dogs, with bottled ketchup and mustard on hand. The menu also includes revamped versions of French fries, coneys, and grilled cheese sandwiches.

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There are also your expected booths, which are big enough to fit probably eight people on busy Gallery Hop nights.

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The breakfast menu follows suit with rich, colorful, and sometimes deconstructed versions of diner classics. We split three dishes amongst the family, starting with the biscuits and red eye gravy. Ohio is more sausage gravy territory than red eye gravy, so you don’t see it too often here. Red eye gravy is more of a Southern dish, typically made with the day’s leftover coffee and the pan drippings from frying ham, bacon, or sausage. Our server made sure we understood which type of gravy we were getting, as previous customers have been surprised to receive a lighter and much sweeter gravy than a chunky, cream-based one.

Philco’s biscuits and gravy are dense and rich. The gravy, which leans more toward the sweet side, soaks into the biscuits, and it’s offset by smokey and salty andouille sausage, then topped with two eggs cooked to order (and sprinkled with paprika).

The portion sizes aren’t huge at Philco, but they make up for it by packing a punch.

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Our server recommended the fried egg tacos. Ironically, they don’t automatically come with fried eggs; you can have them cooked to order, so we asked for them scrambled. Again, the tacos aren’t huge, but they’re rich and filling. They’re topped with various salsas (red + black bean & corn), sour cream, and cheddar. And we added the chorizo. (Because when you have the option to add chorizo, you always do.)

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Finally, we chose the huevos rancheros, built on a base of open-face tortillas and eggs. It’s flavored with a verde salsa and a sprinkling of cotija (a white Mexican cheese). Big bonus for the crispy and flavorful grilled peppers and onions. And we added chorizo because, well, you know.

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Our breakfast dishes went three for three at Philco. Again, the portion size isn’t huge (which some might expect from the “diner” moniker), but they make up for it with big flavors in really colorful presentations. In my mind, this makes Philco an easy choice for breakfast in Short North.

(Also, I know weekends are busy and feature an expanded brunch menu, but don’t forget the value of quiet weekday breakfast, too. Philco opens at 8!)

Philco Bar + Diner on Urbanspoon

Giveaway: tickets to Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams Desserts release party!

COVER_JENI'S SPLENDID ICE CREAM DESSERTS

UPDATE: The drawing is now closed!

Columbus is the epicenter of many great things, ice cream included, and Columbus’ – no, America’s – ice cream queen Jeni Britton Bauer just released her second cookbook, Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream Desserts. This is her second book; the first is Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams At Home (for which she won the James Beard Award). The new book teaches recipes using ice cream in cakes, cookies, sauces, and more. The Columbus book release party is this Friday, May 30th from 7-10pm at the Wexner Center for the Arts.

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Want to win a pair of tickets to the release party? Just comment on this post by 5pm today with your favorite Jeni’s flavor. I’ll start: my go-to’s are the Pistachio & Honey and the Buckeye State.

The Blue Door Cafe & Bakery | Cuyahoga Falls, OH

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The Blue Door Cafe & Bakery
(Facebook)
1970 State Rd. (map it!)
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44223
(330) 926-9774
Open Wed-Sun, 7a-3p
Accepts cash & credit/debit
Vegetarian/vegan/gluten free? Y/N/N

Visited: Friday, May 16, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.

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Thanks to my friend Tom over at Exploring Food My Way, I’ve been hearing a lot about Blue Door Cafe & Bakery over the years. Because of Tom, my Facebook feed is regularly filled with photos of French toast, croissants, and benedicts. It’s a beautiful thing. And finally we got to experience it firsthand. On the road for a weekend trip, my family and I stopped in Cuyahoga Falls to track down the Blue Door. And find it we did: a one-story gray, nondescript little building with a jam-packed parking lot and, yes, a bright blue door.

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As the full parking lot hinted, the inside was busy with customers in line for the bakery or waiting for tables in the cafe. We were seated pretty quickly at a table near the door (which got breezy on a surprisingly chilly May day).

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The menu features the blue door again, with the cafe’s mission statement straight up front.

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I’ve learned from watching Tom’s photo feed that Blue Door is true to the “ever-changing” tenet. The kitchen likes to experiment with specials and ingredients. This is usually a good and bad for regular diners: the downside is that you’re conflicted between choosing your old favorites and the daily specials; the upside is that you can always find something new to try at your old haunt.

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We worked our way through some specials and some regular items. From the specials menu we started with a refreshing Blueberry & Basil Lemonade, balanced nicely between sweet, tart, and slightly herbal. It contains all the title ingredients, plus a hint of vanilla.

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Since the bakery element is clearly a stand-out, we made a couple passes at the beautifully stocked shelves and sampled a two items.

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It’s hard for me to ever pass up a donut, especially when it also has the word “brioche” in the title.

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So we gladly welcomed a custard-filled brioche donut to the table, and proceeded to decimate it. It was perfectly soft, full of custard, and generously dusted with powdered sugar – all without being two sweet. That’s the mark of a good donut: it’s not just a sugar bomb, but it balances the sweetness with other flavors.

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We’ve also heard tell of the croissants, and our server recommended a ham and cheese croissant.

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The croissant was stellar: golden and flaky, with just the right amount of ham and cheese inside.

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By then breakfast began arriving. We began with the corned beef hash with two eggs and a choice of breads from the bakery. The potatoes were thoroughly cooked and mixed with a generous helping of a very smoky brisket. The brisket was very tender, although its smokiness tended to overwhelm the entire dish.

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The eggs are cooked to order, and for that day they were willing to poach them; they were served separately in a little cup, and unfortunately were a little vinegary. They were poached properly, but I think the bottom one sat in the cup a little longer and cooked through more.

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We chose the English muffin (homemade, of course) as our bread. It was large and dense – very different than store bought Thomas’ muffins – and topped with a tart blueberry jam (made in house).

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We also picked the Monte Cristo, in order to taste their fabled French toast in action.

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As far Monte Cristos go, it hit the mark. It was filled with the usual suspects, sandwiched between two (maybe a little too) giant but soft and custardy pieces of French toast. It used some of the same ingredients as the ham and cheese croissant, and came with a side of house-made potato chips.

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The real stand-out was the blueberry pancakes, which were up there with some of the best I’ve had. They’re made with yogurt, which results in flapjacks that are big, fluffy, and browned nicely. Topped with Creme Chantilly (a fancy term for lightly sweetened, real whipped cream), fresh blueberries, and Ohio maple syrup, it’s really hard to beat.

During our meal, owner Michael Bruno stopped over to say hi. He answered our questions and chatted about some of their baked goods. On our way out, we picked up some bakery items to go. Michael recommended their brownies (which were dense and fudgy); we also bought another brioche donut and the last ham and cheese croissant. On the recommendation of the server at the counter, we purchased a pair of moist almond cupcakes. All of them were winners; we had to hide them from the kids so they weren’t devoured immediately.

Consensus? Blue Door is clearly a gem in the Akron-area dining scene. As if I didn’t know that from Tom’s posts and pictures already, just the reaction on social media as I posted photos on Facebook or Instagram (/subliminal message) confirmed it. Pretty much anyone who is from the area or travels there regularly is familiar with the cafe and bakery. Blue Door is a popular hangout and a destination. The sincerely and lovingly made food is reason enough to visit, on top of an adventurous rotating menu, a mission of supporting local and responsibly made products, and the genuine enthusiasm of the owner and employees.

The Blue Door Cafe & Bakery on Urbanspoon

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