RSS Feed

Mazah Mediterranean Eatery | Columbus, OH

IMG_4365
[UPDATE: Mazah is no longer serving brunch.]

Mazah Mediterranean Eatery (Facebook / @Mazah_Eatery)
1453 Grandview Ave. (map it!)
Columbus, OH 43212
(614) 488-3633
Open Mon-Thurs, 11a-3p, 5-9p; Fri, 11a-10p; Sat, 12-10p
Accepts cash & credit/debit
Vegetarian/vegan/gluten free? Y/Y/Y
Kid-friendly? Y

Visited: Saturday, April 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.

IMG_4376
There are a lot of Mediterranean restaurants around Columbus, some of the generic drive-through gyro quality and some more authentic, or at least more elaborate. And of those restaurants, not many serve breakfast. There’s Anna’s in Dublin, Olive Tree in Hilliard, and here: Mazah Mediterranean Eatery in Grandview. Mazah has been open for a few years now, and occupies a small storefront on Grandview Avenue with a small patio. The interior is cozy without feeling crammed, punctuated by warm colors and bits of greenery placed here and there.

IMG_3767

The restaurant was not at all busy when we visited (hint), so we were seated in a booth near the front windows right away. Because we were the focus of attention, a couple different servers kept things coming to us pretty quickly. One of the things I enjoyed about this breakfast was the opportunity to try something different than your standard American eggs-bacon-pancakes. For instance, we started with a couple Turkish coffees. Turkish coffee is served in small mugs; the volume is more akin to an espresso shot than a large cup of drip coffee. But good things come in small packages: Turkish coffee is rich, dark, a tad bitter, and sports a layer of sediment at the bottom. The term “Turkish coffee” actually refers to a preparation of coffee that involves steeping hot water in very finely ground coffee, sometimes with sugar, then serving it in a small cup without straining the grounds. Hence the sediment.

IMG_3776

The brunch dishes at Mazah are colorful and flavorful, such as the simple Potatoes & Eggs: redskin potatoes with scrambled eggs, a generous helping of parsley, and other seasonings.

IMG_3786

It’s a big portion of soft potatoes mixed with the eggs.

IMG_3779

The egg dishes comes with pita bread and your choice of sides. In this case we chose tomatoes, pickles, and hummus.

IMG_3789
We also tried the Fava Beans, which are mixed with olive oil, onions, fresh herbs, garnished with tomato and cucumber. It’s a very protein-rich meal, very filling. All of these meals are also great for sharing – we passed them around the table all throughout the meal.

IMG_3800

With our third meal we ordered sides of hummus, feta, and labineh. Labineh (also spelled labneh) is a strained cheese, made in a process similar to Greek yogurt. It’s flavor is lightly sour and savory, and served with a drizzle of olive oil and za’tar spice.

IMG_3796
One of the real stars of Mazah’s breakfast is the shakshouka, a Middle Eastern/North African egg dish made from cooking eggs in a skillet with tomatoes, onions, garlic, and a rich blend of spices. It’s a great way to have eggs in a different preparation than you normally order. Shakshouka is only served at two places in town (as of this writing): the Olive Tree in Hilliard and Mazah.

IMG_3803
Good to the last drop.

We very much enjoyed our brunch experience at Mazah, and I think the place really does deserve to busier. Their menu includes a diverse mix of dishes that should please everyone, including anyone that might be hesitant about a breakfast beyond the traditional American one. And it’s a chance to explore something new for your morning meal. Also a bonus: solid options for vegetarian, vegan, and gluten free eaters.

ADDITION: If you want to read more about shakshouka, see my article in the May 2013 Crave Magazine.

Mazah Mediterranean Eatery on Urbanspoon

About these ads

About Breakfast with Nick

I love breakfast. So I eat it a lot, & write about it. In my city of Columbus, Ohio & wherever I travel, I'm out to find & enjoy all the breakfasts out there.

One response »

  1. If you ask, they’ll also read your fortune in the grounds of your Turkish coffee!

    Reply

Share your thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 279 other followers

%d bloggers like this: